CHAPTER XXXV

THE CITY ADMINISTRATION

The Mayor and Aldermen constitute the Common Council, which is the legislative body of the city of Grand Rapids. To enter into detailed description of the powers and duties of the several officers is unnecessary, inasmuch as the statutes and ordinances are open for the perusal of every citizen. But of the Aldermen it may be remarked that in addition to their duties in Council they are inspectors of registration and election; are conservators of the peace and may order arrests of violators of State or City laws; are not to hold any other office of which fees or salary are paid by the city, and are not to be interested in any city contract. Following are the city official lists from 1850 to 1889.

YEAR

MAYOR

RECORDER

CLERK

TREASURER

1850

Henry R. Williams

Leonard Bement

Aaron B. Turner

Erastus Hall

1851

Ralph W. Cole

Franklin Everett

A. Hosford Smith

Wilder D. Foster

1852

William H. Withey

Leonard Bement

A. Hosford Smith

Wilder D. Foster

1853

Thomas B. Church

John F. Godfroy

Peter R. L. Peirce

Wm. T. Powers

1854

Wilder D. Foster

Eben’r S. Eggleston

Peter R. L. Peirce

Wm. T. Powers

1855

Charles Shepard

Lovell Moore

Peter R. L. Peirce

Edson Fuller

1856

John M. Fox

Stephen G. Champlin

James Blair

Ebenezer Anderson

1857

William T. Powers

Stephen G. Champlin

Chas B. Benedict

Ebenezer Anderson

1858

Gilbert M. McCray

Stephen G. Champlin

Chas. B. Benedict

Francis Vogt

1859

George K. Johnson

Charles P. Calkins

Evert M. Doubleday

Adolphus F. Rau

1860

Martin L. Sweet

Charles P. Calkins

Evert M. Doubleday

Paul Steketee

1861

George H. White

John W. Champlin

Charles W. Eaton

Noah Stevens

1862

George H. White

John W. Champlin

Charles W. Eaton

Noah Stevens

1863

Charles C. Comstock

Charles P. Calkins

William H. Powers

Noah Stevens

1864

Charles C. Comstock

George W. Thayer

J. Frederic Baars

J. Frederic Baars

1865

Wilder D. Foster

John T. Miller

Edwin Baxter

J. Frederic Baars

1866

Wilder D. Foster

John T. Miller

Robert Wilson

J. Frederic Baars

1867

John W. Champlin

Birney Hoyt

Benjamin F. Sliter

J. Frederic Baars

1868

Moses V. Aldrich

Birney Hoyt

Chas. W. Warrell

J. Frederic Baars

1869

Moses V. Aldrich

Birney Hoyt

Chas. W. Warrell

James D. Lyon

1870

Moses V. Aldrich

Birney Hoyt

Chas. W. Warrell

J. Frederic Baars

1871

Leonard H. Randall

G. Chase Godwin

Chas. W. Warrell

J. Frederic Baars

1872

Julius Houseman

G. Chase Godwin

Chas. W. Warrell

J. Frederic Baars

1873

Peter R. L. Peirce

G. Chase Godwin

Chas. W. Warrell

J. Frederic Baars

1874

Julius Houseman

G. Chase Godwin

Chas. W. Warrell

J. Frederic Baars

1875

Peter R. L. Peirce

(Office abolished)

Chas. W. Warrell

Leonard H. Randall

1876

Peter R. L. Peirce

 

Chas. W. Warrell

Leonard H. Randall

1877

George W. Thayer

 

Chas. W. Warrell

Leonard H. Randall

1878

Henry S. Smith

 

Chas. W. Warrell

Crawford Angell

1879

Francis Letellier

 

Chas. W. Warrell

Wm Sears

1880

Henry S. Smith

 

Chas. W. Warrell

Edwin Hoyt, Jr.

1881

George G. Steketee

 

John J. Belknap

Edwin Hoyt, Jr.

1882

Edmund B. Dikeman

 

John J. Belknap

Homer W. Nash

1883

Crawford Angell

 

John J. Belknap

Homer W. Nash

1884

Charles E. Belknap

 

John J. Belknap

Arthur Meigs

1885

John L. Curtiss

 

John J. Belknap

Arthur Meigs

1886

Edmund B. Dikeman

 

John J. Belknap

Arthur Meigs

1887

Edmund B. Dikeman

 

John J. Belknap

Geo. R. Perry

1888

Isaac M. Weston

 

John J. Belknap

Geo. R. Perry

1889

John Killean

 

Wm A. Shinkman

Geo. R. Perry

 

 

 

YEAR

MARSHAL

ALDERMEN

1850

Alfred X. Cary

Amos Roberts, Charles W. Taylor, Lovell Moore, Josephy Penney, Isaac Turner

1851

Abram W. Pike

Amos Roberts, Martin L. Sweet, George Kendall, Wm. C. Davidson, Loren M. Page

1852

Wm C. Davidson

David Caswell, Aaron Dikeman, Silas Hall, Jacob Woodard, Wilder D. Foster

1853

Robert I. Shoemaker

Charles Shepard, David Caswell, Noyes L. Avery, Eliphalet H. Turner, Ralph W. Cole

1854

Robert I. Shoemaker

Charles Shepard, Martin L. Sweet, Benjamin B. Church, Eliphalet H. Turner, Philander H. Bowman

1855

Leonard Covell

Alonzo Platt, Alexander McKenzie, Wm N. Cook, Wm K. Wheeler, Philander H. Bowman

1856

Ira S. Hatch

Thompson Sinclair, Harry H. Ives, George W. Allen, James P. Littlefield, Lucius Patterson

1857

D. S. T. Weller

Warren P. Mills, Harry H. Ives, Amos Rathbone, Jonathan F. Chubb, James N. Davis, John Clancy, Robert Hilton, Ransom C. Luce, Leonard Covell, Philander H. Bowman. (The revised charter of 1857 increased the number of Aldermen from one to two in each Ward.)

1858

George C. Evans

John McConnell, John Almy, Noyes L. Avery, John W. Williamson, James N. Davis, John Clancy, Robert Hilton, Ransom C. Luce, Leonard Covell, Philander H. Bowman

1859

Leonard Snyder

John Clancy, Harry H. Ives, Ransom C. Luce, William A. Hyde, Chester S. Morey, John McConnell, John Almy, Noyes L. Avery, John W. Williamson, James N. Davis (Under an amendment to the charter, the term of service of the Aldermen was now changed from one year to two, and only five were elected each year, Clancy, Ives, Luce, Hyde and Morey holding over to constitute with the five newly elected the Council of 1860; and hence from this time it is unnecessary to mention any but those elected each year.)

1860

James Cavanaugh

Charles L. Henderson, Elijah D. Waters, Alfred X. Cary, Leonard Covell, Isaac Turner

1861

Leonard Snyder

Wm H. Godfroy, James F. Grove, Henry S. Smith, John T. Elliott, Martinus Keator

1862

Leonard Snyder

Israel L. Crittenden, George M. Huntly, Ransom C. Luce, John R. Long, Newton T. Smith

1863

Francis Boxheimer

Wm H. Godfroy, Robert Davidson, Wm H. Stewart, Alexander Milmine, Thomas Doran

1864

Henry Bremer

Julius Houseman, George C. Fitch, Ransom C. Luce, Lowell Hall, George R. Pierce

1865

Buel H. Babcock

Wm Riordan, David P. Clay, Edward Mohl (to fill vacancy), Simeon L. Baldwin, Franklin B. Day, Isaac Turner (to fill vacancy), Charles G. Brinsmaid, Charles W. Warrell (to fill vacancy)

1866

Buel H. Babcock

Julius Houseman, Burton C. Saunders, Ransom C. Luce, Joseph H. Tompkins, Francillo Hall

1867

Ebenezer Anderson

Dennis W. Bryan, Simeon L. Baldwin, Harry H. Ives, Wm Widdicomb, Adolphus L. Skinner

1868

Miles S. Adams

Julius Houseman, Burton C. Saunders, Ransom C. Luce, Isaac Turner, Chester S. Morey

1869

Allen P. Collar

Thomas Smith, Harry H. Ives, Simeon L. Baldwin, Alexander Milmine, Thomas Doran

1870

Allen P. Collar

John S. Farr, Henry Spring, William Greulich, Adolph Leitelt, Daniel E. Little

1871

Allen P. Collar

John Grady, Thomas Smith, Henry Miller (one year), George G. Steketee, John A. S. Verdier, Peter Granger, John Dale (one year), James R. Lamoreaux (one year), David Lemon, Alexander Milmine, Thomas Doran. (This year the number of wards was increased from five to eight.)

1872

James D. Lyon

Dennis W. Bryan, John Kendall, Simeon L. Baldwin, Adolph Leitelt, Robert B. Woodcock, John French, Samuel O. Dishman, William H. Powers

1873

Thomas Doran

John Grady, Thomas Smith, George G. Steketee, John A. S. Verdier, Ichabod L. Quimby, Frederick T. Little, Alexander Milmine, Peter Weirich

1874

Thomas Doran

Patick J. O’Neil, John Kendall, Wm B. Remington, Frederick Leitelt, Burton C. Saunders, John French, Samuel O. Dishman, Alfred Crawford

1875

Thomas Doran

John Grady, Charles W. Calkins, Lewis W. Heath, Charles A. Hilton, Samuel A. Hogeboom, Isaiah Stewart, Alexander Milmine, Peter Weirich (The office of recorder was abolished in 1875.)

1876

Thomas Doran

Patrick H. O’Neil, Orson A. Ball, George G. Steketee, Frederick Loettgert, Robert B. Woodcock, James Patterson, Henry M. Cadwell, Alfred Crawford

1877

George E. Kenning

John DeGraaf, Charles E. Olney, Philip M. Graff, Adolph Leitelt, Samuel A. Hogeboom, Isaac F. Lamoreaux, S. O. Dishman, Peter Weirich.

1878

Isaac Sigler

John L. Curtiss, Orson A. Ball, John L. Shaw, George Thomson, Joseph N. Fisher, Adelmer D. Plumb, John Lindsey, Thomas Doran

1879

Richard A. Stack

John DeGraff, John Perry, John Benjamin, Adolph Leitelt, Samuel A. Hogeboom, David Winter, Robert Swain, William A. Hayes

1880

Richard A. Stack

John Grady, Nathaniel A. Earle, Daniel F. Thurston, Joseph B. Griswold, Burton C. Saunders, George W. Stanton, Charles E. Belknap, Joseph Schursh

1881

Richard A. Stack

Charles C. Groger, John Perry, John Benjamin, William Cartwright, Thomas Nester, Charles I. Howard, Robert B. Swain, Frank Wurzburg

1882

Amos D. Greene

John Grady, Lyman D. Follett, Erwin J. Herrick, John Killean, S. A. Hogeboom, George W. Stanton, Anthony C. Hydorn, John A. Bovyer

1883

Amos D. Greene

Gerritt H. DeGraff, John P. Creque, John Benjamin, Charles T. Brenner, Samuel A. Hogeboom, George H. Wilmot, Peter Steketee, Heman Palmerlee, Adrian Yates

1884

Amos D. Greene

John Grady, Thomas D. Gilbert, John More, George C. Peirce, John Killean, Thomas Nester, Frederick Saunders, Abraham J. Whitney, James Patterson, Joseph Albright, L. L. Launiere

1885

Thomas Nester

Gerritt H. DeGraff, John P. Creque, Justin M. Stanly, Hugo Thum, Eugene Richmond, Isaiah Stewart, John W. Hayward, George L. Doan

1886

Thomas Nester

Edward Stein, George E. Pantlind, Emmons R. Huntly, Charles T. Brenner, Frederick Saunders, Paul J. Maris, Andrew Doyle, Louis L. Launiere

1887

Charles S. Wilson

Gerritt H. DeGraff, John P. Creque, George H. Davidson, Jacob Eisenhardt, Maurice Shanahan, Isaiah Stewart, John W. Hayward, Joseph A. McKee

1888

Charles S. Wilson

Edward H. Stein, Robert Sproul, Simeon L. Baldwin, Edward O’Donnell, Frederick Saunders, John Hoogerhyde, Frank A. Rodgers, Louis L. Launiere

1889

Charles S. Wilson

Cornelius Stryker, John P. Creque, Albert E. Yerex, Andrew J. Stebbins, Harlan W. Miller, William H. Stokes, Joseph Emmer, Isaac M. Turner (to fill vacancy)


HENRY S. SMITH
was long and honorably associated in Grand Rapids, not only with the commercial enterprise and material prosperity of the city, but with humane and charitable works, with the highest aims of citizenship, and broadest sympathies with the afflicted or oppressed. He was a man of untiring energy of purpose, great activity, with a large fund of varied information, and manifested an earnest interest in the perplexing problems and leading questions of the day. His acute perceptions, with freshness of feeling and sweetness of temperament, made him a sociable and charming companion; while his public spirit and conscientious sense of civic duty gave to the community an excellent citizen. Henry S. Smith was born in Litchfield, Herkimer county, New York, November 11, 1820. While he was yet a lad, his father, Solomon Smith, purchased a farm and removed the family to Cassville, Oneida county, N.Y., and there passed the remainder of his life. Henry received only the limited educational advantages afforded by the public school. Here he spent the years of his youth and early manhood, engaging successfully in several small enterprises, and finally became the owned of the homestead farm. For several years Mr. Smith held the office of Justice of the Peace, in which his solid judgment and firm sense of justice established for him an enviable reputation. He was also Captain in the New York State Militia. In 1858 he came to Michigan and settled in Grand Rapids. Here he began a business career in which he became prominent by the purchase of the Bremer ashery, which he managed but a short time, when he engaged in the manufacture of saleratus. The business rapidly increased. A few years later he began the manufacture of wooden ware and agricultural implements, and became an extensive jobber in the products of other manufacturers. In business he was noted for enterprise, boldness, and strict integrity. He was among the first to send out traveling agents from this city for the sale of its wares, and soon his firm and its manufactures became well known throughout the West. In earlier years Mr. Smith was adverse to mingling in political struggles as a politician; yet during the war was an earnest Republican and Unionist, and a stanch supporter of the same party for many years. His interest in the poor, the untaught, the wronged and the toiler was great and humane. It was natural that many such should seek him as the exponent and defender of their cause. In the spring of 1878, as the candidate of the National Greenback party, he was elected Mayor, and was again elected in 1880. In this responsible and honorable position he was a studious, painstaking officer; faithful in spirit to his constituents, and performing its duties with scrupulous and conscientious fidelity. In 1878 he was also the candidate of the same party for Governor, and though defeated, ran well with his ticket, receiving 73,313 votes. Individually popular, unselfish and pure-minded in character, desiring "the greatest good to the greatest number", and demanding for all men justice and equality, Mr. Smith in these political contests showed a personal strength beyond this party. The conditions of a thoroughly successful business life are exacting and severe. Intense application, close and assiduous attention to details, early and late watchfulness and labor, tenacity of will, hard sense, shrewd observation of facts and chances – these are requisite to win and keep the prizes of such a career. The ability and success of Mr. Smith as a business man show the strong, plain qualities of clear-headedness and will which formed the grit and granite of his nature. Nor does the possession of such qualities of business strength imply a narrow heart – the contrary is exemplified in Mr. Smith’s life. His open hand was not less manifest than his strong and careful grasp. He lived to give. His bestowments were constant and without noise. He was essentially domestic, and his greatest happiness was that of home. By the hearthstone he was the tenderest of fathers, the kind sympathetic husband and brother, the true friend. Those who enjoyed his generous hospitality do not forget his cheerful, kindly ways and conversation, spiced with a dry humor which was irresistible, making him a delightful host. Mr. Smith married his first wife, Lucia Burchard, at Cassville, N.Y. She died March 29, 1865. May 3, 1867, he married Hannah M. Symmes of Grand Rapids, who died January 11, 1873. He again married, September 24, 1879, at Evanston, Illinois, Helen Griffith, who survives him, as also do two daughters, children of his second wife. Religiously, according to the creeds, Mr. Smith was a Congregationalist, but with him the beatitudes of a Christ-life outshone all sectarianism. Though he had not for several years enjoyed robust health, his final illness was brief, and his death was, like his life, calm, cheerful, brave and full of hope. He died December 11, 1881. His last resting place with many of his kindred is in the beautiful cemetery near his early home at Cassville, NY. The funeral services, conducted by the late Rev. J. Morgan Smith, were held at the Park Congregational Church of this city. The funeral oration, the memorial resolutions adopted by the Common Council, the adjournment of the Circuit Court in respect to his memory, although he was not a member of the bar, together with many personal tributes of esteem, marked the universal feeling of sorrow among all classes at the loss of so good a man. In his last moments Mr. Smith said he had tried to do his best in the world. This motive ennobles life, and therein he has left an example of great encouragement for all.

JOHN L. CURTISS was born in the village of Brooklyn, Windham county, Connecticut, August u, 1835. His parents were Chauncey and Polly (Adams) Curtiss, natives of that state. His father died at a very great age, in this city. When John L. was eleven years of age, the family removed to Ontario county, New York. He attended Lima College, where he graduated in 1854. A portion of several winters he spent in school teaching. At the beginning of the War of the Rebellion he enlisted in the Thirty-ninth New York Infantry Regiment; but was rejected on account of a crippled hand, when he immediately came west and resided in Milwaukee five years, engaged in a store. There he married, November 1, 1865, Martha J. Johnson. In 1871 he settled in Grand Rapids, and engaged in the wholesale paper and oil trade, and has been connected with similar trade ever since. Politically, previous to 1876, Mr. Curtiss was a Democrat, but in that year became a pronounced Greenbacker, and has held steadfastly to that faith up to the present time. He has had some experience in official life. In 1878 he was chosen to represent his Ward as Alderman in the Common Council, and served two years. In the fall of 1884 he was elected to the State Senate, and in the following spring was elected Mayor of the city of Grand Rapids. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity. Mr. Curtiss is a bustling, busy man; cheerful and companionable, and one who shows much interest in general affairs and city growth and progress. During his service as Alderman, by faithful attention and strenuous effort, he contributed largely to the prosperity of the First Ward, and its advancement from a relatively minor position to be the peer of any other ward in the city. The administration of the city during his term as Mayor compares favorably with that of any other term. A notable act of that period, showing his Yankee grit, was his veto of an ordinance passed by the Common Council for the adoption of the tower system of electric lights; which received 13 out of 16 votes, and was again passed over the veto by 12 votes, but was carried to the Supreme Court, where the position of the Mayor was sustained. This act saved the city an expense of over $26,000. The City Hall building was begun and the corner-stone laid with appropriate ceremonies during his term as Mayor. In the State Senate (session of 1885) he served upon committees on Reform School, on Canals and River and Harbor Improvements, and on Insurance. At that session he strenuously opposed a resolution introduced by a member from the Upper Peninsula, favoring the purchase by the General Government of the Lake Superior and Portage Lake Canal. The resolution passed, but concerning it he says: "Although it nearly cost me my head, I have the satisfaction of knowing that the scheme failed, and that the United States has not purchased the canal." Mr. Curtiss is still busily engaged in mercantile life.

I(SAAC) M. WESTON, ex-Mayor of Grand Rapids, was born in North Anson, Somerset county, Maine, April 20, 1845. His branch of the Weston family was founded in America by John Weston, who emigrated from Buckinghamshire, England, in 1644, and located at Salem, Massachusetts. Mr. Weston comes from pure Puritan English stock, as his mother is a direct descendant of Stephen Hopkins, who came over on the Mayflower in 1620, and was the intimate friend of Captain Miles Standish. In 1772, Joseph Weston, the great grandfather of I. M. Weston, moved with his wife and children from Concord, Massachusetts, to Somerset county, Maine, being the first family to settle in what is now Skowhegan. He died from exposure received while acting as a Volunteer Air to Gen. Benedict Arnold on his famous expedition up the Kennebec River to Canada, during the Revolutionary War. His son, Deacon Benjamin Weston, born 1765, settled in Madison, Maine, 1786, where he died in 1851. Among his children was Col. William Weston, the father of I. M. Weston, born 1810, educated at the Farmington (ME.) Academy, and died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, November 5, 1882. Upon attaining his majority, he embarked in the mercantile business at North Anson, Maine, and erected a large woolen factory, flouring mill and saw mill, and also engaged extensively in lumbering. He was head Select Man of his town, Captain of the local military company, then regimental Major, and September 11, 1839, was commissioned by Governor Fairfield as Colonel of the Artillery Regiment of the Maine Militia. In 1844 he married Marianne S. Hopkins, who now resides in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They had three children, I. M. being the eldest, Benjamin F., who lives in Oakland, California and Charles E. of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They are all active business men, and devote themselves mainly to banking, manufacturing and real estate investments. In 1860 Col. Weston removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with his family, and made large investments in Michigan pine lands on the Muskegon, Manistee and White rivers, and also engaged in banking and the manufacture of lumber at Whitehall, Muskegon county, Michigan.

In 1861 I. M. Weston resumed his preparatory studies at the Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin, and in 1863 entered the literary department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where he remained two years, and then left for a two years trip on the "Plains".

In 1862, while spending a vacation camping in the wilds of Minnesota, he served as Lieutenant of a volunteer company, raised to repel the Sioux Indians, who arose that year under the leadership of Little Crow, and slaughtered over 400 inhabitants on the Minnesota frontier.

Upon leaving the college in 1865, he accepted a position as traveling correspondent for the Chicago Times, in which capacity he made a trip through Missouri, up the Platte river to Denver, Colorado, and then to Fort Laramie, Dakota, where he joined the command of Gen. P. E. Conner, operating against the Sioux Indians in that region. Later he was appointed Military Storekeeper at Fort Laramie. December 1, 1865, he was ordered to report at Camp Douglas, Salt Lake City, Utah. He immediately started on horseback alone to make the 600 mile trip by the South Pass trail over the Rocky Mountains to his new post. The winter was unusually cold, and the deep snow, severe storms and hostile Indians made the trip exceedingly perilous. The only stopping places were telegraph stations from thirty to seventy miles apart, garrisoned by soldiers for protection from hostile Indians. After crossing the summit his horse became exhausted and had to be abandoned. He finished the journey to the overland stage line at Fort Bridger on foot, where he arrived January 1. He went on to Salt Lake City, and after serving the Government one month, accepted the position of Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager of the Daily Union Vedette, a radical anti-Mormon paper, which Gen. Conner had established about a year previous. In this position, although but twenty years of age, he acquired a national reputation as a bold, strong, aggressive writer in the warfare he urged against the despotic rule of Brigham Young. His paper was the only daily published in the territories of Utah, Idaho, Montana and Arizona, and he trebled its circulation and made a handsome profit for the owner the year he controlled it. His experience was exciting, and included several narrow escapes from death at the hands of the Mormon Danites. The building of a telegraph line to Montana, and the prospect of a daily paper at Virginia City, with four days advantage of the Vedette in its best field, made him advise the proprietor to sell.

Mr. Weston then returned to Milwaukee, and accepted the offer of a partnership with his father in the lumber business, and, excepting a few months service as editorial writer on the Milwaukee News, abandoned newspaper work. For the next ten years he resided in Milwaukee and Michigan, following the lumber business in connection with his father and his brother, B. F., excepting less than a year spent on his stock ranch in Colorado. In 1877 he also became Cashier and manager of the Lumberman’s State Bank of Whitehall, of which his father was president. He reorganized it as the First National Bank, and succeeded his father as President and controlling owner upon the retirement of the latter from active business in 1879. He still holds the same position. January 1, 1881, he removed to Grand Rapids, and took the Cashiership of the Farmers and Mechanics’ Bank, which he reorganized as the Fourth National Bank, with an increased capital. In three years he trebled the business, and resigned to give more time to his outside business, and has since devoted himself to his other banking, real estate and manufacturing investments. He is a stockholder in various Grand Rapids furniture, insurance and other companies, is interested in several Detroit enterprises, and has been for several years a heavy operator in Mississippi and Louisiana pine lands.

In politics, Mr. Weston is a prominent and active Democrat. At an early age he was a poll worker in Milwaukee, and at twenty-two was Secretary of his township committee in Michigan in the Presidential contest of 1868. He continued active on township and county committees until 1880, when he was made member of the State Central Committee, and nominated by his party for State Treasurer. For six years he was a member of the Executive Committee, and Treasurer four years, until 1886, when he was made Chairman, and re-elected for another two years in 1888. He has had the longest consecutive service of any man ever on the State Committee. For six months previous to May 6, 1888, Mr. Weston was also acting member of the Democratic National Committee for Michigan, under a proxy from Postmaster General Dickinson. During the campaign of 1888 he was President of the Democratic Association of the Northwest, which included all the Northwestern State Chairmen. Since 1881 Mr. Weston has served two years as Treasurer of the Grand Rapids Board of Education, and four years on the Board of Police and Fire Commissioners, the last year as President. In 1882 Mr. Weston was a member and Treasurer of the Congressional Committee of the Fifth District, when the Democrats elected their candidate for the first time in twenty-six years. In 1884 the Democratic delegates to the Fifth District, joint Democratic-Greenback Congressional Convention, presented Mr. Weston’s name for the nomination, and under a three-fourths rule he polled over two-thirds of the votes for sixty-five ballots, but his being President of one National Bank and Vice-President of another, created Greenback opposition, and he insisted on his name being dropped. In April, 1888, he was elected Mayor of Grand Rapids. The same year the State Convention of his party elected him First Delegate at Large to the St. Louis National Convention, which renominated President Cleveland. After his intimate personal and political friend, Postmaster General Dickinson, went to Washington, Mr. Weston enjoyed in a marked degree the confidence and friendship of President Cleveland and his Cabinet. One of the last official acts of President Cleveland was the appointment of Mr. Weston as Government Commissioner to examine for acceptance the last section of the Southern Pacific Company’s railroad, between San Francisco and Portland, Oregon.

Mr. Weston never married, and is well known in many club houses of the country. He is a member of the famous old Manhattan Club of New York, the Iroquois of Chicago, and the Detroit and Grosse Pointe of Detroit. He is a charter member of the Peninsular Club of Grand Rapids, and was chairman of the committee which raised the money to build its magnificent club house. He is also a member of the younger Owashtanong Club of Grand Rapids, and has been its President since January 1, 1886. In 1866 he was Commodore of the Northwestern Amateur Rowing Association, President of the Grand Rapids Base Ball Club during the days of the Northwestern League, and the first Exalted Ruler of the Grand Rapids Lodge of Elks. Although raised in the Congregational Church, he has been identified with the Episcopal Church since his college days, and has served several terms as Vestryman and Treasurer in churches of that denomination. In his political and official methods, Mr. Weston is clean, strong and methodical.

He is a representative citizen in the fullest sense, with broad and liberal but well defined views. He is progressive and aggressive, always up with the times, and alive to any enterprise calculated to promote the growth or prosperity of his city. His contributions for charity are liberal, and made without ostentation. As Mayor, Mr. Weston made an ideal head of the city government. His extensive acquaintance and great fund of general information upon all matters pertaining to municipal management, enabled him to give Grand Rapids a strong, intelligent and popular administration, and his formal recommendations to the Council were of a character that received only the hearty approval of thinking citizens. Upon all occasions he showed himself a chief executive who reflected only credit on the city and honor on the office he was so admirably calculated to fill. His prominence in political and business circles has given him a National reputation and acquaintance, and this enabled him to accomplish much in promoting the progress and prosperity of his city.

JOHN KILLEAN was born at Buffalo, New York, November 27, 1831. While he was quite young his father moved out of the city and settled on a farm in the town of Hamburg, Erie county, N.Y. That portion of Western New York was then newly and sparsely settled, with here and there a log school house. Mr. Killean’s early educational privileges were those of attendance at a district school during the winter months until he was sixteen years old. At the age of twenty-three, February 18, 1855, he married, in the city of Buffalo, Mary C. Walsh. He was thereafter mostly engaged in the lumber business until his removal to Grand Rapids, where he soon entered the grocery trade, in which occupation he is still engaged, as senior of the firm of John Killean & Son. He came to this city in October, 1863, and it has since been continuously his place of residence. In the spring of 1882 he was elected Alderman from the Fourth Ward, and re-elected to the same office in the spring of 1884. During his service as Alderman he was for three terms in succession chosen President of the Common Council. As an Alderman he was conspicuous for close and studious attention to the duties of the position and his careful and painstaking attention to the interests of his ward and constituency, as well as to those of the city at large. In the spring of 1886 he was appointed a member of the Board of Police and Fire Commissioners. At the general election in November, 1886, he was elected one of the Representatives from this city to the State Legislature, and was re-elected in 1888. At the charter election in April, 1889, he was elected Mayor of the city of Grand Rapids, which office he now holds. As a representative man and a public spirited citizen, he has won the popular esteem, and is yet in the full vigor of life and a manly career.

CITY CONTROLLERS, 1857 - 1889

YEAR

CONTROLLER

1857-1860

Nelson Robinson

1861-1862

Edward Mohl

1863-1864

Frederick L. Mayer

1865-1866

Hendrikus DeJonge

1867-1870

James Vander Sluis

1871-1874

Fernando Page

1875-1876

John A. S. Verdier

1877-1878

John Van Strien

1879-1882

Henry Bremer

1883-1886

George B. Reiley

1887-1888

Charles N. Armstrong

1889

James Vandenberge

 

DIRECTORS OF THE POOR

YEAR

DIRECTORS

1850

Benjamin F. Martindale, Leonard Covell

1851

George Coggeshall, James Miller

1852

George Coggeshall, Thompson Sinclair

1853

James Scribner, David S. Leavitt

1854

Leonard Covell, W. B. Renwick

1855

Silas Hall, Luman R. Atwater

1856-1857

Aaron Dikeman, Curtis Porter

1858

Ebenezer Anderson, John Ingraham

1859

Elijah D. Waters, Ebenezer Anderson

1860

Silas Pierce, Ebenezer Anderson

1861

Aaron Dikeman, Ebenezer Anderson

1862

John Gezon, Frederick W. Tusch

1863

John Gezon, Ebenezer Anderson

1864

John Geson, Peter Wurzburg

1865-1866

John Gezon, John Bylsma

1867

John Gezon, Robert W. Love

1868-1869

Leonard Vis, John Bylsma

1870

Leonard Vis, Bernard F. Shinkman

1871

Leonard Vis, John Bylsma

1872

John Steketee, John Bylsma

1873

John Steketee, Isaac Simmons

1874

Ebenezer Anderson

1875-1876

David Lankester

1877

Charles A. Hilton

1878

Plimmon S. Hulbert

1879-1881

David Lankester

1882-1883

Cornelius Fox

1884-1888

Joseph Rupprecht

1889

Hubrecht Wagemaker

 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE AND YEARS WHEN CHOSEN

YEAR

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE

1850

Samuel F. Butler, Ezra Reed, James Miller, Lucius Patterson

1851

Hiram Rathbun, Nathaniel P. Roberts

1852

Harvey K. Rose, Lucius Patterson

1853

David S. Leavitt, Thaddeus Foote, Jr.

1854

William Bemis, Leonard Bement

1855

Thompson Sinclair, Arba Chubb

1856

William Ashley, Jr.

1857

Thompson Sinclair, Christopher W. Leffingwell

1858

James Van Buren

1859

Arba Chubb

1860

William E. Grove

1861

Thompson Sinclair, John D. Bennett, Christopher W. Leffingwell

1862

Benjamin A. Harlan

1863

William P. Barker, Adolphus L. Skinner

1864

George H. White

1865

Thompson Sinclair, Leonard Bement, A. L. Skinner

1866

Leonard Bement

1867

John D. Bennett

1868

Henry H. Slauson

1869

Thompson Sinclair, Edmond J. Shinkman

1870

Alfred Putnam

1871

Emory Wheelock, Clauson O. Buddington, Burton C. Saunders, Daniel B. Arnold, John B. Bennett

1873

Thompson Sinclair, Edmond J. Shinkman

1874

Malcolm M. Moore

1875

Emory Wheelock, Leonard Bement, William G. Saunders, James R. Lamoreaux, George G. Whitworth

1877

Thompson Sinclair, Edmont J. Shinkman

1878

Malcolm M. Moore, John W. Holcomb

1879

Charles J. Potter, James D. Robinson, Freeman Lathrop, William G. Saunders, John W. Holcomb

1880

Byron F. Lockwood

1881

Robert H. Vickers

1882

Thompson Sinclair

1883

William O. Westfall, David G. Fletcher

1884

Henry Brouwer, William G. Saunders

1885

Harvey P. Yale, William G. Saunders

1886

Thomas Walsh

1887

William O. Westfall

1888

Henry Brouwer

1889

Henry A. Hydorn, David D. Hughes

   

 

ASSESSORS, 1850 - 1856

WARD

YEAR

ASSESSOR

First Ward

1850

William J. Welles

First Ward

1851

Lewis Porter

First Ward

1852

David S. Leavitt

First Ward

1853

John King

First Ward

1854

David S. Leavitt

First Ward

1855

William H. Withey

First Ward

1856

Harry Eaton

Second Ward

1850

James M. Haldane

Second Ward

1851

Harvey K. Rose

Second Ward

1852-1855

John W. Peirce

Second Ward

1856

Robert Hilton

Third Ward

1850-1851

Ezra T. Nelson

Third Ward

1852

Abram W. Pike

Third Ward

1853

Harry Dean

Third Ward

1854

George J. Barker

Third Ward

1855

Ezra T. Nelson

Third Ward

1856

James D. Lyon

Fourth Ward

1850-1852

Baker Borden

Fourth Ward

1853-1854

Elihu N. Faxon

Fourth Ward

1855

Baker Borden

Fourth Ward

1856

Ebenezer Anderson

Fifth Ward

1850

Loren M. Page

Fifth Ward

1851

Willard Sibley

Fifth Ward

1852

Loren M. Page

Fifth Ward

1853-1855

Nathaniel P. Roberts

Fifth Ward

1856

Christopher P. Leffingwell

 

CONSTABLES, 1850-1889

YEAR

CONSTABLES, 1850-1856

1850

Robert N. Garratt, Leonard Snyder, Abram W. Pike, Wilson Jones, Joseph J. Baxter

1851

Robert N. Garratt, Wilson Jones, Jonathan H. Gray, William A. Brown, Timothy Calahan

1852

Robert M. Collins, James D. Lyon, Timothy Calahan, John Furlong, Winthrop R. Cady

1853

Winthrop R. Cady, Henry G. Stone, Isaac M. Watson, Duncan Stocking

1854

Thomas R. Renwick, Daniel S. T. Weller, Ezekiel Welch

1855

Sebra Rathbone, Franklin C. Stone, Nelson Davis, C. L. Norris, Charles Stone

1856

William H. Godfroy, Charles B. Dean, Isaac Gibson, Gideon Colton, Charles W. Warrell

From this time the constables, being elected by wards, are so classified.

 

WARD

YEAR

CONSTABLES

First

1857

Bernard Boyle

First

1858

Henry W. Granger

First

1859-1861

James Shields

First

1862-1863

John Duris

First

1864

William Dole

First

1865-1867

William H. Godfroy

First

1868-1869

Henry DeVries

First

1870-1871

Robert Audrain

First

1872

John Quinn

First

1873-1877

Thomas Connors

First

1878

Timothy Crowley

First

1879-1880

Edwin F. Doty

First

1881-1882

Nathaniel U. Weeks

First

1883

Orin McCurdy

First

1884-1885

Nathaniel U. Weeks

First

1886

John Quinn

First

1887-1889

Joseph C. Pitkin

Second

1857

Paris G. Clark

Second

1858-1859

Ebenezer H. Cady

Second

1860-1861

Joseph Wyckoff

Second

1862-1869

Isaiah Peak

Second

1870

Nelson Hamblin

Second

1871

William P. H. Ferris

Second

1873-1885

Adolphus N. Bacon

Second

1886-1887

Randall S. Parkman

Second

1888

Peter Reynders

Second

1889

Randall S. Parkman

Third

1857

Michael Connolly

Third

1858

John R. Stewart

Third

1859-1860

Peter A. Bogardus

Third

1861

Amos L. Wheeler

Third

1862-1870

William P. H. Ferris

Third

1871-1872

Miles S. Adams

Third

1873-1875

Sylvester J. Bailey

Third

1876-1882

Survetus S. Chamberlain

Third

1883

John Quartel

Third

1884-1887

William W. Thomas

Third

1888

Klaas Vander Wall

Third

1889

John H. Harris

Fourth

1857

George F. Porter

Fourth

1858

Charles B. Dean

Fourth

1859

Peter C. Shickell

Fourth

1860-1865

Noadiah C. Wright

Fourth

1866

Adelbert Devendorf

Fourth

1867-1870

James R. Lamoreaux

Fourth

1871

Nelson Hamblin

Fourth

1872

Paris G. Clark

Fourth

1873

William P. H. Ferris

Fourth

1874

Paris G. Clark

Fourth

1875-1878

Peter Martin

Fourth

1879

George W. Bentham

Fourth

1880

Henry Pulver

Fourth

1881

Ebenezer H. Cady

Fourth

1882

Isaac Greenbaum

Fourth

1883

John DeJonge

Fourth

1884

Ebenezer H. Cady

Fourth

1885-1887

Darius L. Arnold

Fourth

1888-1889

Malcolm B. Palmer

Fifth

1857-1858

Charles W. Warrell

Fifth

1859-1860

George W. Dodge

Fifth

1861-1862

Francis Boxheimer

Fifth

1863-1864

John Hyland

Fifth

1865

William Haynes

Fifth

1866

Mason C. Kidder

Fifth

1867

Andrew Thompson, Jr.

Fifth

1868

George Pearl

Fifth

1869

George Stang

Fifth

1870

Joseph S. Bailey

Fifth

1871-1872

Isaiah Peak

Fifth

1873

James E. Davis

Fifth

1874

Bernard McCaghery

Fifth

1875

Michael Finn

Fifth

1876-1880

Levi L. Phillips

Fifth

1881

James P. Hayes

Fifth

1882-1884

Trafton H. Pond

Fifth

1885

Josiah H. Case

Fifth

1886

Michael McCuen

Fifth

1887-1889

Trafton H. Pond

Sixth

1871-1872

Adelbert Devendorf

Sixth

1873

Horace Austin

Sixth

1874-1875

Joseph Karr

Sixth

1876

Josiah A. Brown

Sixth

1877-1878

Hollis R. Hills

Sixth

1879-1881

Isaiah Stewart

Sixth

1882

James Smith

Sixth

1883

William McCullum

Sixth

1884

Sebastian Green

Sixth

1885-1887

Timothy Haan

Sixth

1888

Joseph W. Lindsay

Sixth

1889

John Miedema

Seventh

1871-1872

Orlin M. W. Cleaveland

Seventh

1872

Washington L. Stinson

Seventh

1874

George Dole

Seventh

1875

Henry French

Seventh

1876

Redmond Walsh

Seventh

1877-1878

Cornelius Mastenbrook

Seventh

1879

Arthur C. Prince

Seventh

1880

Cornelius Mastenbrook

Seventh

1881

John B. Hudson

Seventh

1882-1885

Cornelius Mastenbrook

Seventh

1886

Henry O. Schermerhorn

Seventh

1887-1889

Cornelius Mastenbrook

Eighth

1871-1875

Joseph S. Bailey, Jr.

Eighth

1876-1877

Daniel Sullivan

Eighth

1878

Alvin D. Connor

Eighth

1879

Daniel Sullivan

Eighth

1880

Alvin D. Connor

Eighth

1881-1882

John C. Hannett

Eighth

1883

Thomas Keefe

Eighth

1884

William K. Adams

Eighth

1885

John C. Hannett

Eighth

1886

Cornelius Mastenbrook

Eighth

1887

Alphonso Button

Eighth

1888-1889

Daniel Moyland

 

COLLECTORS, 1859 – 1889

WARD

YEAR

COLLECTOR

First

1859-1861

John King

First

1862

Silas Pierce

First

1863-1871

Patrick Grady

First

1872

William Riordan

First

1873-1874

Patrick Grady

First

1875-1877

James Shields

First

1878

Berend DeGraaf

First

1879

Cornelius Sonke

First

1880

Berend DeGraaf

First

1881

Peter Otte

First

1882-1883

Manney J. Lewis

First

1884

Gysbert W. Dommerlin

First

1885-1888

Henry Hoeksema

First

1889

Martin DeJaeger

Second

1859

Daniel Alcumbrack, Ezekiel W. Davis

Second

1860

Adolph Leitelt

Second

1861

George M. Huntly

Second

1862-1864

John DeRuyter

Second

1865-1869

August Schmidt

Second

1870

John DeRuyter

Second

1871-1886

James Muir

Second

1887

Dirk J. Doornink

Second

1888

Luman R. Atwater

Second

1889

Dirk J. Doornink

Third

1859

Danford M. Crosby

Third

1860-1861

George G. Steketee

Third

1862

William N. Cook

Third

1863

John Benjamin

Third

1864-1866

William Verburg

Third

1867

Miles S. Adams

Third

1868-1870

James Muir

Third

1871

William Verburg

Third

1872

Adrian DeYoung

Third

1873-1874

Henry Jewett

Third

1875-1879

Timothy Haan

Third

1880-1885

Henry Jewett

Third

1886

Gerrit Van Dam

Third

1887-1889

Burt Ema

Fourth

1859

Samuel O. Dishman

Fourth

1860

John D. Bennett

Fourth

1861

Joseph S. Hampton

Fourth

1862

Frederick W. Cordes

Fourth

1863-1864

John Bylsma

Fourth

1865

James G. Scott

Fourth

1866

Moses DeLong

Fourth

1867-1870

Joseph H. Bennett

Fourth

1871-1872

John DeRuyter

Fourth

1873-1874

William G. Beckwith

Fourth

1875-1877

Theodore S. Tompkins

Fourth

1878-1880

John B. Vander Heyden

Fourth

1881-1889

Charles A. Robinson

Fifth

1859

Charles W. Warrell

Fifth

1860

Harm Luton

Fifth

1861-1862

Frank Frederick

Fifth

1863

Frank Arnold

Fifth

1864-1865

John Hake

Fifth

1866

William H. Stinson, Jr.

Fifth

1867-1870

John Hake

Fifth

1871-1873

John E. Tooher

Fifth

1874-1876

Patrick Gill

Fifth

1877

Martin Hendricks

Fifth

1878

Fernando Page

Fifth

1879-1880

Abraham DeBruyn

Fifth

1881-1882

Fred Saunders

Fifth

1883

James Stoutjesdyk

Fifth

1884

Leonard Garlow

Fifth

1885

John Sparks

Fifth

1886

Daniel Viergever

Fifth

1887

George H. Schnabel

Fifth

1888

William A. Dunn

Fifth

1889

Albert Reitberg

Sixth

1871

Joel G. Scoby

Sixth

1872-1874

John Johnson

Sixth

1875

Richard A. Stack

Sixth

1876-1877

James Sullivan

Sixth

1878

Richard A. Stack

Sixth

1879

John DeKruif

Sixth

1880

James C. Shaw

Sixth

1881

Gerrit Meinardi

Sixth

1882

James C. Shaw

Sixth

1883

Joseph W. Karr

Sixth

1884

Bartel Jonker

Sixth

1885

Klaas Mulder

Sixth

1886-1889

John Hoogerhyde

Seventh

1871-1873

Henry M. Cadwell

Seventh

1874

Charles Pettersch

Seventh

1875

Henry M. Cadwell

Seventh

1876

Charles Pettersch

Seventh

1877

William D. Hembling

Seventh

1878-1879

Charles Pettersch

Seventh

1880

George A. Thomas

Seventh

1881-1882

Baker Borden

Seventh

1883

Albert S. Damskey

Seventh

1884-1885

John A. Lemon

Seventh

1886-1887

John Cullen

Seventh

1888

Hans H. Fitting

Seventh

1889

John Cullen

Eighth

1871

William Worbes

Eighth

1872-1873

John Hake

Eighth

1874

Charles Bissonette

Eighth

1875

John Hake

Eighth

1876

William A. Shinkman

Eighth

1877

Thomas Walsh

Eighth

1878

William Koch, Sr.

Eighth

1879

Thomas Walsh

Eighth

1880-1881

John A. Smith

Eighth

1882-1887

Robert Blumrich

Eighth

1888-1889

Thomas O’Keefe

 

CITY SURVEYORS, 1850 – 1889

YEAR

CITY SURVEYORS

1850

Wright L. Coffinberry

1851

William Slawson

1852

John Almy

1853

James Lyman

1854-1855

Wright L. Coffinberry

1856

John Almy

1857

William Burke

1858-1859

Henry Yates

1860-1861

Wright L. Coffinberry

1862-1863

John Almy

1864-1868

Wright L. Coffinberry

1869-1870

Emory W. Muenscher

1871

Wright L. Coffinberry

1872-1876

Emory W. Muenscher

1877-1882

Alfred C. Sekell

1883-1889

Homer A. Collar

 

STREET COMMISSIONERS, 1850 – 1854

Louis Moran, Samuel F. Butler, Daniel Beebe, Leonard Covell, Willard Sibley, Philander Tracy, James Bentham, George W. Daniels, Thomas Sargeant, Daniel F. Tower, Nelson Davis, Edward P. Camp, Martin L. Sweet, Benjamin F. Gouldsbury, Duncan T. Stocking, Edmund Carrier.

 

HIGHWAY COMMISSIONERS-APPOINTIVE, 1873 – 1889

DISTRICT

YEAR

HIGHWAY COMMISSIONERS

First

1873-1874

Patrick Coade

First

1875-1877

John W. Gorham

First

1878-1879

Patrick H. O’Neil

First

1880-1881

Hubrecht Wagemaker

First

1882

Thomas Martin

First

1883

Richard Walsh

First

1884-1885

Hubrecht Wagemaker

First

1886

Richard Walsh

First

1887

William Walsh

First

1888-1889

Martin Van Overeen

Second

1873

Henry S. Smith

Second

1874-1876

Moses DeLong

Second

1877-1879

Frederick Platte

Second

1880-1881

Moses DeLong

Second

1882-1883

Edward Hydorn

Second

1884

Moses DeLong

Second

1885-1888

William E. Bloxton

Second

1889

John Berles

Third

1888

William Walsh

Third

1889

William Fitzpatrick

 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS

The Board of Public Works was established by Act of the Legislature, March 22, 1873, which has been amended several times. The Board has general superintendence of public buildings, works and improvements in the city, including the water works, and the bridges across Grand River. It also lets contracts for such works; and is in a measure the financial executive arm of the city. But it acts under direction and control of the Common Council in so far as providing funds and the assent of that body are concerned – in these essential preliminaries the action of the Board is only advisory. Its members are appointed by the Common Council upon nomination by the Mayor, the term being three years. Following is the list, with dates of appointments:

YEAR

ADVISORY BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS

May, 1873

John B. Colton, Thomas D. Gilbert, William T. Powers, Wellington Hibbard, Lewis C. Davidson

May, 1874

John L. Shaw

May, 1875

Thomas D. Gilbert, William T. Powers

May, 1876

Franklin B. Day, John S. Farr

May, 1877

James Miller

September, 1877

Lemuel D. Putnam (to fill vacancy)

May, 1878

William P. Innes, Thomas Farmer

May, 1879

George W. Thayer, William Hovey

December, 1879

Lewis H. Withey (to fill vacancy)

May, 1880

Charles C. Comstock

May, 1881

Orson A. Ball, Wilder D. Stevens, Adelmer D. Plumb, Francis B. Gilbert

December, 1881

Orville L. Howard (to fill vacancy)

May, 1882

George W. Thayer, David E. Emery

May, 1883

Adelmer D. Plumb

May, 1884

Wilder D. Stevens, Francis B. Gilbert

August, 1884

George G. Briggs (to fill vacancy), reappointed in May, 1885

May, 1885

George W. Thayer, David E. Emery

May, 1886

Edmund B. Dikeman (Mayor, ex-officio), James N. Davis

May, 1887

Wilder D. Stevens, George G. Briggs

May, 1888

Isaac M. Weston (Mayor, ex-officio), Freeman Godfrey, William R. Shelby

September, 1888

John S. Farr (to fill vacancy)

May 6, 1889

James N. Davis, John Killean (Mayor, ex-officio)

 

PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS:

April, 1873 to May, 1878 – Thomas D. Gilbert

May, 1878 to November, 1879 – James Miller

December, 1879 to May, 1888 – George W. Thayer

Since May, 1888 - George G. Briggs

SECRETARIES:

April, 1873 to August, 1875 – Arthur M. Warrell

August, 1875 to February, 1878 – A. B. Farnsworth

Since February, 1878 - Fred A. Twamley

ENGINEERS:

April, 1873 to May, 1877 – E. W. Muenscher

May, 1877 to May, 1883 – A. C. Sekell

Since May, 1883 - Homer A. Collar

 

BOARD OF REVIEW AND EQUALIZATION

This Board was constituted by a provision in the Revised Charter of 1877. The most prominent among its duties are, to receive and review the annual assessment rolls, and to examine and equalize them between the several wards of the city as in its judgment shall be deemed just and equitable in the relative valuations. Its members are commissioners to make assessments for local improvements. They are also member of the County Board of Supervisors. The following is the list:

YEAR

MEMBERS OF BOARD OF REVIEW AND EQUALIZATION

1877

James W. Brown, John W. Williamson, James Gallup

1878

John W. Williamson, James Galllup, Henry R. Naysmith

1879

Henry R. Naysmith, James W. Brown, John J. Belknap

1880

James W. Brown, Henry R. Naysmith, John J. Belknap

1881

James W. Brown, Charles W. Warrell, William N. Cook

1882

James W. Brown, William N. Cook, Hiram Gumaer

1883

William N. Cook, Hiram Gumaer, James W. Brown

1884

Hiram Gumaer, James W. Brown, James B. Gulliford

1885

James W. Brown, James B. Gulliford, Charles L. Shattuck

1886

James B. Gulliford, Charles L. Shattuck, Adolphus L. Skinner

1887

Charles L. Shattuck, Adolphus L. Skinner, James B. Gulliford

1888

Adolph L. Skinner, James B. Gulliford, Charles L. Shattuck

1889

Adolphus L. Skinner, Charles L. Shattuck, James B. Gulliford

 

BOARD OF POLICE AND FIRE COMMISSIONERS

The powers and duties connected with and incident to the government and discipline of the Police and Fire Departments of the City of Grand Rapids, are by act of the Legislature, May 24, 1881, devolved upon a board of five commissioners known as the Board of Police and Fire Commissioners, the members of which are appointed by the Common Council, on nomination by the Mayor. The first five members were designated in the act constituting the Board. The term for which each is appointed is five years, and the terms expire in rotation, one each year. The Board was organized June 7, 1881, and the following is the list of appointments:

DATE

POLICE AND FIRE COMMISSIONERS

June 6, 1881

George G. Briggs for the term of one year.

George W. Gay for two years

Lewis H. Withey for three years

William H. Powers for four years

Israel C. Smith for five years

May 1, 1882

George G. Briggs was renominated for a full term, but not confirmed, and no successor being appointed he held over for one year, acting as President of the Board.

July 2, 1883

Isaac M. Weston to serve four years in place of George G. Briggs

Andrew J. Rose for five years to succeed George W. Gay

Alfred D. Rathbone in place of Israel C. Smith who resigned.

May 5, 1884

Lewis H. Withey

May 4, 1885

William H. Powers

March 16, 1886

A. J. Rose resigned, and March 22 – I. S. Dygert was appointed to fill vacancy.

May 3, 1886

John Killean

November 15, 1886

Lewis E. Hawkins in place of John Killean, who resigned.

May 31, 1887

John E. More

May 7, 1888

Adolph Leitelt

May 6, 1889

Frederick Loettgert

These were for full terms except where otherwise noted. Under a rule of the Board, the Commissioner whose term will soonest expire is designated President of the Board, holding the office for the term of one year; provided, that no commissioner is eligible to the position of President unless he had served the full year next preceding. June 10, 1881, Alpha Child was appointed Secretary of the Board and served until August 22, 1881, when he resigned and Alfred A. Tracy was appointed. Mr. Tracy served until April 27, 1881, when he resigned and Benjamin F. McReynolds, the present Secretary, was appointed, and has since served continuously. William H. Powers is now (1889) President of the Board.


Document Source: Baxter, Albert, History of the City of Grand Rapids, New York and Grand Rapids: Munsell & Company, Publishers, 1891. (Name Index)
Location of Original: Various.
Transcriber: Evelyn Sawyer
URL: http://kent.migenweb.net/baxter1891/35city.html

Created: 19 October 2001[an error occurred while processing this directive]